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    One of the biggest sporting events of the year is quickly approaching. No, we aren’t talking about the Super Bowl; rather, the one and only Puppy Bowl.

    Set to take place on the same day as the final football game of the year (aka Super Bowl), Feb. 2., team Ruff and team Fluff will battle it out for the “Lombarky” trophy and the MVP — Most Valuable Pooch — award.

    A total of 96 adorable puppies, including five with special needs, from 61 shelters from the U.S. and beyond will be taking the field for the 16th annual game.

    puppy for puppy bowl
    Special needs dog Filbert. Image courtesy of Animal Planet

    Related: After Losing His Parents, Football Player Has His Two Rescue Dogs Accompany Him on Senior Day

    During the big event, people will get to view the game from all angles, including the water bowl cam, locker room cam and the puppy kiss cam. There will also be Surge the hamster, who will be keeping score, goat cheerleaders and the kitty halftime show, featuring Jenni-PURR Lopez and Cat-ira.

    Besides seeing adorable puppies play, give kisses and engage in some nose-to-nose action, Animal Planet will also once again feature The Dog Bowl, a competition featuring adult and senior dogs currently at shelters looking for homes. There will also be Pup Close and Personal segments, showcasing heartwarming stories of some of the dogs.

    Related: NFL Player Opens Up About Why He Chose a Pit Bull Foundation for His ‘My Cause My Cleats’ Game

    The “tail-gaiting” pre-game show starts at 2 pm ET/11 am PT, with the main event beginning at 3 pm ET/ 12 pm PT on the Animal Planet channel.

    Check out a few of our favorite dogs who will taking the field.

    puppy for puppy bowl
    Image courtesy of Animal Planet

    Name: Dolly
    Team: Fluff
    Breed: Labrador Retriever/German Shepherd
    Age: 16 weeks
    Rescue: Hearts & Bones Rescue, NY
    Fun Fact: Likes to labra-doodle in her spare time

    puppy for puppy bowl
    Image courtesy of Animal Planet

    Name: Crumpet
    Team: Ruff
    Breed: American Staffordshire Terrier
    Age: 14 weeks
    Rescue: Angel City Pit Bulls, Calif.
    Fun Fact: Serves his tea piping hot

    puppy for puppy bowl
    Image courtesy of Animal Planet

    Name: Papaya
    Team: Fluff
    Breed: Labrador Retriever/Border Collie
    Age: 17 weeks
    Rescue: Shaggy Dog Rescue, Texas
    Fun Fact: Refers to herself as a “dish best served raw”

    puppy for puppy bowl
    Image courtesy of Animal Planet

    Name: Betty
    Team: Ruff
    Breed: Bulldog
    Age: 17 weeks
    Rescue: Florida Little Dog Rescue, Fla.
    Fun Fact: Is 100% that pooch

    puppy for puppy bowl
    Image courtesy of Animal Planet

    Name: Bobby
    Team: Fluff
    Breed: Lhasa Apso/Miniature Poodle
    Age: 17 weeks
    Rescue: Helen Woodward Animal Center, Calif.
    Fun Fact: True heir to the Iron Bone

    puppy for puppy bowl
    Image courtesy of Animal Planet

    Name: Huck
    Team: Ruff
    Breed: Miniature Poodle/Shih Tzu
    Age: 20 weeks
    Rescue: Vanderpump Dogs, Calif.
    Fun Fact: Never misses a crumb

    puppy for puppy bowl
    Image courtesy of Animal Planet

    Name: Theodore
    Team: Fluff
    Breed: Pomeranian/Siberian Husky
    Age: 13 weeks
    Rescue: AHeinz 57 Pet Rescue, Iowa
    Fun Fact: Never misses a blow out

    puppy for puppy bowl
    Image courtesy of Animal Planet

    Name: Linus
    Team: Ruff
    Breed: Pomeranian/Miniature Poodle
    Age: 14 weeks
    Rescue: New Life Animal Rescue, NJ
    Fun Fact: Was once mistaken for a stuffed animal


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    When dogs “shake-off” after a bath, the reason is clear — it’s your dogs’ personal drying system. It’s also incredibly efficient. In fact, a study conducted on the physics of an animal self-drying and published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface found that dogs can shake-off around 70 percent of water on their fur in four seconds. But dogs also shake-off when they’re dry — and that means something entirely different. The dog shake-off is part of their body language. Since they can’t talk, it’s up to us to interpret. “We can make some good guesses, based on when dogs do this behavior and what comes afterwards,” says Kristin Benson, certified dog trainer and owner of Kristin Benson Dog Training in Manitoba, Canada. There are specific situations in which dogs shake-off that can give us insight to the meaning of the action. Here are few examples:

    After a Nap

    Benson notes that dogs sometimes shake-off when they stand up after a nap, often accompanied by a full-body stretch. “This is likely similar to what you do when you get up off your office chair: a quick stretch to get the muscles moving again.” Related: Sleep Tight: 6 of the Best Orthopedic Dog Beds on the Market In this case, your dog is shaking off the grogginess of sleep in order to wake up, reinvigorate their body and get ready for action. The shake-off after a nap acts like a dog’s cup of coffee.

    In Times of Stress

    “Shaking-off can be a sign of stress,” says Lauren Novack, certified dog behavior consultant, professional animal trainer and director of training at Behavior Vets. “Any behavior that occurs ‘out of context’ is likely a sign of stress.” This type of shake-off is sometimes called an adrenalin flush. In this case, stress can mean physical or emotional stress that’s negative or positive. Related: Why ‘Good’ Dogs Bite and How to Prevent It A dog might shake-off after the stress of encountering a strange dog in the park, after smelling something intriguing, after sitting in one position for a stretch of time or when he’s uncomfortable or fearful. The shake-off in this case is the dog version of a human taking a deep breath and letting something go.

    In Social Situations

    Dogs may shake-off after an exciting or stressful interaction with another dog or a human. They may have been uncomfortable or cautious, but were on their best behavior. The shake-off is a way of releasing both tense muscles and tense emotions. You may see a dog shake-off after energetic play with other dogs. “Although most of the time when dogs are playing rough, it’s fine for both parties, occasionally there seems to be an intensification that one or both dogs decide isn’t playful anymore,” says Benson. At this point, they stop, check each other out, and do a quick shake-off. It functions as a brief timeout and allows the dogs to take it down a notch in play or stop playing altogether.

    After High-Energy Exercise

    “I have seen dogs who are playing athletically occasionally use a shake-off,” says Benson. The dogs are shaking out extra excitement as well as the tension in their muscles. A dog will also shake-off when after he’s been jumping around like a maniac waiting for you to put on his leash. When it’s finally attached, he shakes off the rush of energy to be ready to go on his walk. It’s the dog version of a full-body reboot. Dogs will sometimes shake-off after you return home. With their exceptional hearing, your dogs already knew that you were home way before you unlocked the front door, and they’ve been on high alert. The shake-off in this case is a way of releasing that energy and moving into a calmer state of mind.

    When Feeling Uncomfortable

    “In some cases, dogs will shake-off because they are uncomfortable, itchy or have a skin or ear problem,” says Benson. This type of shake-off is often accompanied by scratching or pawing at the source of the discomfort. Sometimes, a dog will shake-off mental discomfort. A dog may feel stressed if you suddenly come home to find him lying in the antique armchair that’s definitely off-limits. When your dog jumps off, he may shake-off the discomfort of wanting to be on the chair but having to move to another place. Or maybe he actually feels uncomfortable at being caught. The shake-off provides a way to get rid of the unpleasant feeling. Just like any other body language, in order to understand you have to observe what happened right before and right after. The shake-off appears to be either a self-calming or signaling effort, says Benson. It helps release tension and signals a pause in activity. Related: Here’s What Is in Dog Food That Causes Allergies — and What to Do About It

    From a fully body reboot to releasing stressful energy, here are specific situations in which dogs shake-off and why they do it.

    When dogs “shake-off” after a bath, the reason is clear — it’s your dogs’ personal drying system. It’s also incredibly efficient. In fact, a study conducted on the physics of an animal self-drying and published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface found that dogs can shake-off around 70 percent of water on their fur in four seconds. But dogs also shake-off when they’re dry — and that means something entirely different. The dog shake-off is part of their body language. Since they can’t talk, it’s up to us to interpret. “We can make some good guesses, based on when dogs do this behavior and what comes afterwards,” says Kristin Benson, certified dog trainer and owner of Kristin Benson Dog Training in Manitoba, Canada. There are specific situations in which dogs shake-off that can give us insight to the meaning of the action. Here are few examples:

    After a Nap

    Benson notes that dogs sometimes shake-off when they stand up after a nap, often accompanied by a full-body stretch. “This is likely similar to what you do when you get up off your office chair: a quick stretch to get the muscles moving again.” Related: Sleep Tight: 6 of the Best Orthopedic Dog Beds on the Market In this case, your dog is shaking off the grogginess of sleep in order to wake up, reinvigorate their body and get ready for action. The shake-off after a nap acts like a dog’s cup of coffee.

    In Times of Stress

    “Shaking-off can be a sign of stress,” says Lauren Novack, certified dog behavior consultant, professional animal trainer and director of training at Behavior Vets. “Any behavior that occurs ‘out of context’ is likely a sign of stress.” This type of shake-off is sometimes called an adrenalin flush. In this case, stress can mean physical or emotional stress that’s negative or positive. Related: Why ‘Good’ Dogs Bite and How to Prevent It A dog might shake-off after the stress of encountering a strange dog in the park, after smelling something intriguing, after sitting in one position for a stretch of time or when he’s uncomfortable or fearful. The shake-off in this case is the dog version of a human taking a deep breath and letting something go.

    In Social Situations

    Dogs may shake-off after an exciting or stressful interaction with another dog or a human. They may have been uncomfortable or cautious, but were on their best behavior. The shake-off is a way of releasing both tense muscles and tense emotions. You may see a dog shake-off after energetic play with other dogs. “Although most of the time when dogs are playing rough, it’s fine for both parties, occasionally there seems to be an intensification that one or both dogs decide isn’t playful anymore,” says Benson. At this point, they stop, check each other out, and do a quick shake-off. It functions as a brief timeout and allows the dogs to take it down a notch in play or stop playing altogether.

    After High-Energy Exercise

    “I have seen dogs who are playing athletically occasionally use a shake-off,” says Benson. The dogs are shaking out extra excitement as well as the tension in their muscles. A dog will also shake-off when after he’s been jumping around like a maniac waiting for you to put on his leash. When it’s finally attached, he shakes off the rush of energy to be ready to go on his walk. It’s the dog version of a full-body reboot. Dogs will sometimes shake-off after you return home. With their exceptional hearing, your dogs already knew that you were home way before you unlocked the front door, and they’ve been on high alert. The shake-off in this case is a way of releasing that energy and moving into a calmer state of mind.

    When Feeling Uncomfortable

    “In some cases, dogs will shake-off because they are uncomfortable, itchy or have a skin or ear problem,” says Benson. This type of shake-off is often accompanied by scratching or pawing at the source of the discomfort. Sometimes, a dog will shake-off mental discomfort. A dog may feel stressed if you suddenly come home to find him lying in the antique armchair that’s definitely off-limits. When your dog jumps off, he may shake-off the discomfort of wanting to be on the chair but having to move to another place. Or maybe he actually feels uncomfortable at being caught. The shake-off provides a way to get rid of the unpleasant feeling. Just like any other body language, in order to understand you have to observe what happened right before and right after. The shake-off appears to be either a self-calming or signaling effort, says Benson. It helps release tension and signals a pause in activity. Related: Here’s What Is in Dog Food That Causes Allergies — and What to Do About It


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    If you’re wondering if you’d make a good foster parent, consider all the reasons why fostering an animal helps make the world a tiny bit better, one dog at a time.

    Fostering, or providing a temporary home for a dog rescued from a shelter before he or she is adopted, helps the animal adjust to life in a family while freeing up space at the shelter for another homeless dog. The foster period can last from a few days to weeks and sometimes months. It may require you to attend adoption events with your foster dog and do home visits with potential families.

    While fostering is unbelievably rewarding, it can be challenging. Understanding the foster process and getting yourself, your family, other pets and your home ready will set you up for success and ensure you have a truly amazing experience.

    How Do You Know If You’d Make a Good Foster Parent?

    “Foster parents come in all shapes and sizes,” says Sarah Brasky, founder and executive director of Foster Dogs, a nonprofit organization that connects rescue organizations with adopters and fosters.

    Related: Move Over Patti Stanger, New York City Has ‘The Dog Matchmaker’

    While certain factors may help improve the foster experience, there isn’t a “foster type” that you need to fit. Just like people, dogs have different personalities and lifestyle needs. “It’s all about finding a dog that’s the right fit for your lifestyle,” Brasky says. “Kids, other pets, limited mobility or working long hours — these are all factors that should not be considered barriers to fostering.”

    A foster just needs to be able to provide both a safe and a loving environment, as a dog needs support making the transition from shelter to a new life. It’s important to not only be compassionate but also patient, open-minded and welcoming.

    Are You Ready to Foster a Dog?

    If you are a renter, make sure you are allowed to have dogs in your home. Check your lease for any pet restrictions. “Some building managers are flexible, some have a zero-tolerance policy (one complaint and the dog must go) and some have a no-pets policy altogether,” says Brasky.

    Consider your neighbors too, Brasky suggests. “Keep in mind that there might be frustrated neighbors while your foster pup adjusts. You want a building that is reasonable with those types of growing pains.”

    When it comes to determining what kind of dogs would be ideal to foster, Foster Dogs suggests asking yourself some questions:

    • What type of dog will work best for me: high energy, low energy, large, small, puppies, seniors or special needs dogs?
    • Is everyone in my household onboard with getting a foster dog?
    • If you live with others, will you be the primary caretaker or will others be able to help?
    • What arrangements (dog walker, pet-gated area, pet sitter) will I need to make when I am work or if I go away?
    • Does my own dog get along with other dogs?
    • Will the organization provide funds for food and veterinary care? If not, do I have the financial means to take care of a foster dog?

    How Should You Prepare Your Home for a Foster Dog?

    Before bringing a foster dog home, you should get your home ready, according to Foster Dogs. Create a place that will be the foster dog’s safe, comfy place when she needs to retreat and regroup. This space can include a bed, blankets, a crate, a water bowl and toys. It’s a good idea to have a crate that closes, especially if you already have another dog in your home.

    You’ll need to dog-proof each room. Similar to puppy-proofing, pick up any sharp objects and choking hazards like paper clips, bottle caps, staples, nails, pins, needles, yarn and rubber bands. Then get down on the floor at a dog’s level, and look again.

    Put cleaning products and medications on high shelves or in cabinets with child-proof locks. Consider investing in a dog-proof, locking trash can. Store human food in closed pantries and cabinets.

    Cover cords and wires or move them out of reach. Look for and block any small spaces that your foster dog might try to hide in. Either secure or put away any breakable objects that are valuable. Move houseplants out of reach.

    Keep washing machines and dryers closed, and block access to the space behind. If you’re getting a small breed or puppy, make sure that the toilet lid is always down. Keep foster dogs out of the garage; there are too many toxic chemicals and tools. 

    Related: Yes, You Can Foster a Dog and Have a Full-Time Job

    A fenced in yard is ideal, but it must have a secure fence before you let a dog off-leash. Check the perimeter for holes and the bottom of the fence for places a dog can dig or slip under. Remove anything by the fence that a dog can climb up on. Make sure latches and locks on the gate are secure. Finally, don’t leave the dog alone in the backyard. If you can’t supervise, bring the dog inside.

    How to Introduce Your Own Dog to a Foster Dog

    Before agreeing to bring a foster dog home, take your dog to the shelter or organization for a meet and greet; it’s a neutral place where the dogs can sniff each other out with any personal territory to protect, according to Foster Dogs.

    Even if your dog loves other dogs, you can’t predict how the foster dog will act, or how your dog will react to the particular dog you bring home. Even dogs who have never shown any aggression can suddenly attack when faced with a strange animal on their home territory.

    To decrease the chance of a conflict, before bringing your foster dog inside your home, walk both dogs on secure leashes outside. Either walk them with one on either side of your, or have someone walk one dog while you walk the other. Let them sniff if they want, but keep a close watch and tight hold on the leash.

    If the dogs seem to get along, it’s a good idea to have the dogs sit with space between them, and have them each do some basic commands. If the foster doesn’t know any commands, reward her for calm behavior. This exercise tells your dogs that you are in charge, so they can look to you if they feel anxious or afraid.

    If they seem uninterested in each other, that can be a good sign. When you bring them inside, put one dog in a room with a baby gate, like a kitchen, and keep the other dog on the outside. Let them sniff each other through the gate. Do not take off their leashes.

    If either of them shows signs of aggression, such as growling, bared teeth, ears flat to the head, lunging or snapping, give both dogs their own space and make sure they can’t get at each other.

    Many foster dogs are initially shutdown emotionally, very scared or didn’t come from an ideal situation, which is why a safe space is so important. Keep the dogs separate for a few days. If you see any aggression, block their ability to see each other.

    After a day or two, let them see each other, but still keep them separated. If things are calm, you can try letting them sniff through the gate, and reward each one for not reacting.

    The next step is to remove the gate. Allow them to interact as long as the behavior is positive. Let them sniff and play but avoid giving them toys at first when they’re together to avoid any resource guarding. When you leave the house, keep the dogs in separate areas. If they continue to fight or be aggressive, get in touch with the foster organization immediately for next steps.

    During the foster process, keep in regular contact with the rescue organization with updates, any questions about training, and your insight into finding the perfect family.

    When your foster dog finally finds his or her forever home, it’s a great feeling — but it can also be heartbreaking to let the dog go. Just remember, there are so many other dogs waiting for you to save their life.

    Related: Clint Eastwood’s Daughter Launches Fostering Network to Save Shelter Dogs

    Please note the above is intended to be informative and not professional advice.


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    Just like babies, puppies need specific food, as they have different nutritional needs than adult or senior dogs. In fact, not feeding your puppy the correct food can have serious developmental consequences.

    “Puppy food is an important element of growth for muscles, bones, neurologic heath and overall wellness,” says holistic veterinarian Jim D. Carlson, who’s also host of a Vet Advice Podcast and Awesome WooWoo Holistic Vet. 

    Puppies need more calories to maintain their body temperature, more amino acids to support their growth, more calories from protein and fats and more minerals such as calcium for growing bones. “Puppy foods have about 4 percent more protein than adult foods, so sticking with straight puppy food for a year is important,” notes Dr. Carlson.

    While you can feed an adult dog puppy food (though it’s not recommended, and it may cause weight gain), feeding a puppy adult dog food may significantly impair their health and growth. So how do you know when it’s time to switch your puppy to an adult diet?

    Unfortunately, it’s not a one-size-fits-all situation. Although dogs are generally considered to be puppies until they are a year old, the need to feed puppy food varies with the individual dog and even with breed.

    Related: The Rules of the Game: How to Keep Your Puppy Safe During Playtime

    If you have a puppy (and before you decide to get one), you should do as much research on what puppies need. That includes things like care, feeding and training. You should also talk to your veterinarian about the best food choices.

    Here are some tips to help you figure out when it’s time to switch your fur baby to grown-up food.

    Signs That It’s Time for Adult Dog Food

    Both age and weight play a factor in making the switch. For example, says Dr. Carlson, if your puppy is close to a year old, and he’s getting chubby, it might be time to switch. Adult dog food has less protein than puppy food and less calories.

    “One important difference in puppy food needs is in breeding,” notes Dr. Carlson. He says that big breeds, like Great Danes, take longer to stop growing and may benefit from an additional year on puppy food.  

    Puppies should generally switch to adult dog food when they reach a certain age, weight, and/or growth. This works out approximately:

    Toy Breeds: The adult weight of toy breeds is generally 4 to 7 pounds (though a toy can go as low as 3 pounds). They usually finish growing at around 10 to 12 months.

    Small Breeds: The adult weight of small breeds is around 8 to 20 pounds. They usually finish growing at around 12 months.

    Medium Breeds: The adult weight of medium breeds is 21 to 50 pounds. They usually finish growing at around 12 months.

    Large Breeds: The adult weight of large breeds is 51 to 85 pounds. They reach maturity at around 18 to 24 months.

    Giant Breeds: The adult weight of a giant breed is more than 85 pounds. They reach their adult growth at around 18 to 24 months. Another indicator is when they grow into their paws.

    Related: You Can Thank Us for Those Puppy Dog Eyes

    This is only a general guide and will vary with the individual dog, but it should serve as a baseline.

    How to Switch Your Puppy’s Food

    When it’s time to switch your puppy to adult food, you should do it slowly. Switching too quickly may cause stomach upset and gastrointestinal issue such as vomiting or diarrhea. Leading up to the change, be sure to research your food options.

    There is more than commercial food available, such as fresh food delivery services. You can also learn how to make your own home cooked dog food, including the proper supplements that needed to be added to the food.

    Dr. Carlson recommends swapping ¼ of your dog’s meal each week to adult food until you fully transition into adult food. So, on the first week, you’d give your dog ¼ serving adult food and ¾ puppy food; on the second week, you’d do ½ adult food, ½ puppy food. This allows your pups stomach to get used to the new food (along with her taste buds).

    While going slow shouldn’t make your dog’s tummy upset, if you do notice signs like gastrointestinal rumbling, diarrhea, constipation or vomiting, take your pup to the vet.

    Related: Could Looking at Adorable Puppy Pictures on the Web Actually Make You More Productive?


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    Music is good for our soul; it energizes us, releases feel-good endorphins and can boost overall health. Some of these benefits are also great for our pups, with tunes helping with relaxation and anxiety.

    And now Spotify is capitalizing on this. The music-streaming company has just released a playlist for our pups, along with other furries including cats … and hamsters.

    Related: Music to Shelter Dogs’ Ears: Spotify Is Helping Animals Get Adopted By Sharing What Songs They Like

    The company, which current has 113 million subscribers, developed the “algorithmically curated” playlists for our pooch to help with stress.

    The playlist is dictated by the dog parent’s preference. People log on to Spotify, upload a pic of their pup and answer a few questions — is he/she energetic or shy; friendly with everyone or selective; and so on. Then, Spotify will create a custom playlist for your dog.

    Image courtesy of Spotify

    The company didn’t stop there. It also created a dog-focused podcast, called My Dog’s Favourite Podcast. It was created with the help of animal behaviorists to help relax your dog. Currently, featuring two episodes – “The Tail Begins” and “Pup Fiction” – the episodes are each five hours long and voiced by British actors Ralph Ineson (Game of Thrones) and Jessica Raine (Call the Midwife). (How can your dog not be soothed by posh British accents?). Besides storytelling, the podcasts also feature relaxing music and noises like rain.

    Related: Vet Serenades Scared Dogs at Office With Music

    Keep in mind, here is nothing better than being next to your dog, especially during times of stress, but if you have to be away, you can give the personalized pet list a spin on Spotify.


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    Patsy, a border collie/kelpie mix, became a viral sensation after a video showing her after she rounded up 900 sheep, saving them from one of the many fires in Australia.

    “Hey Patsy, can you hear those sheep?” Cath Hill, whose brother, Stephen, is Patsy’s owner says in a Facebook video. “That’s all your work, well done. You little champion, good girl.”

    Allow me to introduce Patsy the wonder dog. In the early hours of 31 December 2019, while fire in Corryong was bearing down them, she and my brother rounded up the sheep and brought them to the safest paddock on the farm. She then found a safe spot while my brother fought the fire with a tractor and a tank of water. Almost all sheep are safe, along with the hay bales and silage, the shearing shed, and both farm houses. My brother doesn’t do social media, but Patsy does. Great job little girl 🙂Update 7 January 2020 – Patsy and her family are busy cleaning up the farm and helping others get sorted out. You can help too! They would love you to donate to these bushfire relief fundraising collections: https://www.wildlifevictoria.org.au/?view=article&id=145:helping-wildlife-during-bushfires&catid=11:wildlife-informationhttps://blazeaid.com.au/donations/how-donate/https://www.redcross.org.au/campaigns/disaster-relief-and-recovery-donateUpdate 5 January 2020 – Patsy is now on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/p/B67HA-xHJSH/?igshid=126abkbj2hytc #patsythecorryongwonderdog #strongincorryongUpdate 4 January 2020 – Patsy’s story is spreading, so for those people who would like to donate funds to help the Upper Murray community, please support these links which are confirmed to be genuine and keep sharing Patsy’s post 🙂https://www.parksideproduce.net.au/products/feed-for-fire-gift-voucherhttps://www.gofundme.com/f/xycjem-cudgewa-has-burnt?utm_source=customer&utm_medium=copy_link&utm_campaign=p_cp+share-sheethttps://www.gofundme.com/f/a-little-town-and-its-community-need-some-help?utm_source=customer&utm_medium=copy_link&utm_campaign=p_cp+share-sheet

    Posted by Cath Hill on Friday, January 3, 2020

    The 6-year-old dog helped Stephen save the sheep on New Year’s Eve after a bush fire broke out near them and quickly spread.

    Despite the smoke, heat and danger, Patsy calmly worked to ensure the flock was out of harm’s way, herding them to safety.

    We spoke to Hill to learn more about they story behind the viral video. (Stephen is working hard, doing post-fire recovery on his farm and helping the community.)

    Related: Dog Badly Burned in Fire Is Training to be a Therapy Dog for Burn Victims

    Q: Can you share exactly what happened that led up to the huge rescue effort?

    A: We were up on the farm for the Christmas and New Year holiday season with my brother when the fires came through.

    On the 30th of December, fire conditions in North East Victoria were extremely dangerous. Temperatures were over 40 degrees Celsius (104 F), and the winds were very strong.

    Late in the afternoon, a bush fire started about 30 kilometers (approximately 18 miles) away from our family farm in Corryong. Due to the extreme conditions, the fire was unable to be controlled by firefighters and it spread very quickly.

    We received warnings about the fire on our mobile phones and realized there was a chance that the fire could come our way, so we packed up our things and got ready in case we needed to evacuate into the town for safety. At that stage, we didn’t expect to need to evacuate from the farm until the morning. However, the fire moved much faster than anyone expected, and the strong winds were blowing embers far ahead of the main fire front, causing new spot fires.

    Around 11 pm that night, my brother got a phone call that the fire was moving very quickly and starting to cause spot fires close to us, so my family and I evacuated into the town, while my brother Stephen stayed on the farm with Patsy to defend the farm against the fire.

    Stephen was quite adamant that he should stay on his own, as he didn’t want to risk anyone else’s safety. The farm was reasonably prepared for a fire, but if conditions are bad enough, a bush fire can be so intense that the best preparations can make no difference at all and everything can be destroyed.

    The paddocks closest to the shearing shed and the main house had been grazed and mown so that there was no grass on them. There was very little fuel there to burn.

    We had sprinklers on the roofs of both farmhouses, and Stephen had a water tanker on the back of the tractor ready to put out the fires once they got close to the houses and the sheds. What he needed to do was get the sheep from the outer paddocks and into the paddocks next to the house and shearing shed. But, because it was nighttime and the smoke was getting very thick, visibility was very poor. Stephen needed to wait until dawn for the visibility to improve, but all the time the fire was getting closer.

    Image courtesy of Instagram account Patsythecorryongwonderdog

    Around 4 am, it was the 31 of December now, the morning of New Year’s Eve, Stephen decided he couldn’t wait any longer. So, he headed out on his quad-bike, a four-wheeler motorbike, with Patsy to round up the sheep and bring them to the paddocks next to the house. The fires were close enough by now that they were throwing out enough light for Stephen and Patsy to see the sheep. Working one paddock at a time, they brought 900 sheep in to the house paddocks. This is where Patsy really showed what she can do.

    Q: What did she do to keep the sheep safe?

    A: Despite the smoke, the heat, the fire getting steadily closer, she just focused on the job of finding the sheep in each paddock, rounding them up and moving them with Stephen to where they needed to go. The fires didn’t really make much of a difference for her! She’s a border collie/kelpie cross, so she’s a working dog through and through. These dogs have been bred for generations to develop their ability to work with sheep and cattle on farms, and they are very intelligent and resilient animals. They love to work; it’s just what they are bred to do. They can be very focused and single-minded on the job.

    So, when my brother needed Patsy to help bring the sheep in to safety, that’s exactly what she did. She just got on with her job and did it, regardless of the conditions. We do think Patsy’s incredible, but most well-trained, skilled working dogs would have done the same. That said, even the best dogs can have a bad day at the office, so we are all very glad that Patsy wasn’t having a bad day on New Year’s Eve!

    sheep in australia fires
    Image courtesy of Instagram account Patsythecorryongwonderdog

    Q: But even after the sheep were safe, it wasn’t over, right?

    A: Once the sheep were all safely in the house paddocks, Stephen went out on the tractor and fought the fire with the water tanker to keep the shearing shed, the hay shed and the houses from burning.

    Patsy found herself a safe spot, no one is actually quite sure where, but we think she probably went under the house. The sprinkler was running on the house roof so that would have been the coolest and wettest place around.

    From where we were in the town, my family and I could see the fire front as it crossed the farm and then spread down the valley. By this stage, we had lost power and all communications, so we had no idea what was going on at the farm.

    Related: A Dog Separated From His Family During the Deadly California Fires Is Finally Reunited With Them a Month Later

    The last time I spoke with Stephen before we lost phone communications, I knew that he and Patsy had got the sheep in to the house paddocks, he was just waiting for the fire to come. After that, we didn’t know if he had been able to defend the farm or if the fire had been too strong. We didn’t know if he and Patsy had made it through or not. We just had to wait until they came back to the house in town, and that wait was the longest of my life. Seeing them come through the door safely was one of the best moments of my life.

    Border Collie Kelpie Mix
    Image courtesy of Instagram account Patsythecorryongwonderdog

    Q: What was your reaction to the Patsy video going viral?

    A: People often joke about wanting to go viral on social media, but really, Patsy’s story going viral across the world is simply mind blowing. We still can’t believe that she’s been seen by literally millions of people!

    When I posted that 20-second video of Patsy on Facebook, all I wanted to do was show our friends and family that we were okay, and that despite the destruction and devastation, we had a lot to be thankful for. I made it public and didn’t think anything more of it. And then off it went! It got shared and shared again, hundreds of thousands of people saw it, and within 48 hours the international internet news sites had found the story and they just ran with it.

    It was particularly hard for Stephen to get his head around how far and how quickly Patsy’s story spread, because he doesn’t use social media at all. But once we realized that people really responded to Patsy’s story as a little piece of good news to come out of the devastation of the fires, we thought we should keep sharing it as a positive and hopeful message.

    If it helps raise awareness of the bushfire crisis in Australia, and helps encourage people to donate to bushfire relief, and puts a smile on people’s faces too, then it’s got to be a good thing.

    We are blown away by the interest, support and good wishes from everyone all over the world. It really means a lot to little communities like Corryong and other places in Australia that have been impacted by the fires.

    Q: How has the post-fire recovery been?

    A: For now, the fire danger in Corryong has eased, so Stephen and Patsy are hard at work with the fire recovery efforts. The sheep, the farmhouses, the shearing shed and the hay were saved, but the paddocks are almost all completely burnt, and most of the farm fencing will have to be replaced. The machinery shed was burnt down, too. Stephen has been working to repair fencing on the farm, look after the sheep that he and Patsy saved, and help other farmers in the local area.

    At times like this, everyone pitches in to help each other. There are people in our community who have lost absolutely everything, so we really have been very lucky. As a working dog, Patsy enjoys having things to do, so any time someone needs some help rounding up sheep or cattle she’s always happy to help!

    When she’s not working, she loves to ride on the back of the quad bike, and jump in water troughs!!

    dog on truck
    Image courtesy of Instagram account Patsythecorryongwonderdog

    Q: What can you tell us about the fires right now?

    A: Unfortunately, the fire crisis in Australia is not over, and it’s not going to be over for a long time, no matter what we do. These are the worst fires in living memory, and the combination of fires, long-term drought and record-breaking hot temperatures has produced a disaster on a huge scale. As well as people losing their homes, farms and livelihoods, 28 people have died due to the fires across Australia. Over 10 million hectares (15.6 million acres) of land including bush, national parks and forests have been burned, with the loss of millions of wild animals. The fires have been burning for months, in different states, and the recovery is going to take a very long time. If people would like to make a donation to help, these are some bushfire relief causes that our family supports. All donations will be very gratefully received.

    GoFundMe
    Wildlife Victoria
    BlazeAid

    Related: Dog Risks His Life to Stay With Flock of Goats Amid Dangerous Wildfires


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    Former CEO of pet-boarding company DogVacay, Aaron Hirschhorn, recently appeared on Shark Tank with a bunch of puppies to pitch his new company aimed at helping pets recover from the crippling diseases typical to aging.

    “If you were to flash forward just 10 short years, four of five of these little guys are going to suffer from devastating age-related ailments like arthritis, blindness or worse,” Hirschhorn said on the show.

    He believes his company, Gallant, can help. The Los Angeles-based startup allows pet owners to bank their dog’s stem cells for regenerative therapies later in life. Two of the sharks, Anne Wojcicki and Lori Greiner, took the bait, offering him $500,000 for 5 percent of the company. Hirschhorn accepted.

    Related: Is This the New Way to Calculate Your Dog’s Age?

    Aaron Hirschhorn on Shark Tank.
    Aaron Hirschhorn on Shark Tank.

    The company, which has already raised $11 million from prominent Silicon Valley investors, focuses on two areas: a bank to store pets’ stem cells and developing new treatments using stem cells.

    “At the moment, most people aren’t aware that regenerative medicine actually addresses the root causes of many diseases instead of masking symptoms, which is what most traditional medicine does,” Hirschhorn tells This Dog’s Life. “We want to make this knowledge accessible to people and help them be aware of stem cell banking while their pups are young.”

    Regenerative medicine uses stem cells to repair diseased, damaged, or dysfunctional tissue. Stem cells have the ability to develop into different cell types, such as blood, brain, bone or heart muscle cells, which can then be used to regenerate, repair or replace damaged cells. Stem cells can also self-regenerate by cell division even after long periods of inactivity.

    Hirschhorn’s inspiration came from his own experience with pain and the relief he got from regenerative therapy, particularly the use of stem cells to repair damaged tissue.

    Related: New Study Is Looking to Help Dogs With Arthritis Using Stem Cells

    “For more than 10 years, I struggled with debilitating chronic back pain, which left me unable to do activities I loved,” Hirschhorn says.“ After researching and going through multiple treatments — including surgery and even attempting to burn a nerve — I discovered regenerative medicine. I went through a same-day procedure allowed by the FDA, and it successfully cured my pain.”

    After experiencing the benefits of stem-cell therapy firsthand, Hirschhorn’s attention turned to pet stem cells after his beloved family dog Rocky began to suffer from severe arthritis that became so painful she was unable to walk. “I wondered if the same stem cell therapy that cured my back could have been used to help her and other pet ailments,” he says.  

    He gathered together a team of veteran scientists specializing in regenerative medicine, led by Dr. Linda Black, DVM, PhD, and the company’s Chief Scientific Officer. With advisors and board members from VCA, PetSmart Charities and insurance company Trupanion, they set out to create an accessible and easy process for banking stem cells for pets for future use.

    The ideal time to bank stem cells is when your dog is young, as over the course of a dog’s life 99 percent of stem cells are lost, according to Hirschhorn. “When you take your puppy to be spayed or neutered, the tissue that vets usually throw away is saved in a Gallant Collection kit,” he says. Gallant works with the veterinarian to collect the “stem cell-rich reproductive tissue they would normally discard and place it into the collection kit.”

    Image credit: Gallant Collection kit
    Image credit: Gallant Collection kit

    The kit is then sent by courier to the Gallant lab where scientists inspect the quality of the tissue and isolate the stem cells. The stem cells are then cryopreserved in their lab in San Diego until needed, explains Hirschhorn.

    If you have an older dog, it’s still possible to get stem cells, but those procedures are currently fairly invasive, says Hirschhorn. However, he adds that “with our acquisition of the veterinary division of Cook-Regentec, we have research on ways to extract stem cells non-invasively at later stages of a dog’s life through a skin biopsy or from their teeth.”

    If and when your dog needs stem cells for regenerative therapies, they will be readily available at the company’s state-of-the-art laboratory.

    Dr. Black of Gallant shared an example with This Dog’s Life of a successful therapy. Zoe, a 7-year old Border Collie, injured her spine while playing Frisbee. “After undergoing stem cell treatment, she recovered 95 percent back to her normal self, running and playing pain-free without medication,” she says.

    But some people aren’t sold on stem cells. There has been a lot about stem cells actually not working, or worse, causing horrible side effects, and critics say there needs to be more research. But according to Dr. Black, “Stem cell therapies have been demonstrated in clinical studies to help dogs with a myriad of ailments including osteoarthritis, atopic dermatitis and chronic dry eye, amongst others.”

    The service isn’t cheap. The kit is $395 and stem-cell banking costs $95 a year, or $595 for a lifetime. But for Gallant, the cost is worth it. “Our mission is to ensure that millions of families can keep their pets healthier and happier,” says Hirschhorn.

    Related: Senior Dog Suffering Pain From Arthritis? Here are 8 Alternatives to Giving Your Dog Drugs.


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    There are big dog people and small dog people … and a few that adore any dog, regardless of size. I confess: I am a small breed lover. I have two, a 4-pound Yorkie and an 8-pound Pomeranian, and I can’t get enough of them. But they do come with their own set of challenges.

    Small breeds are often feisty dogs who firmly believe they are the size of German Shepherds. While that’s an admirable quality, it can be dangerous. Sometimes a big dog just gets tired of the little dog’s antics and swats him away. But many small breeds are fragile, and even a casual “get away from me” push can result in an expensive injury.

    chihauhua on carpet

    They also have unique health conditions, can develop undesirable personality traits and are unfairly stereotyped.

    Related: Here Are 10 Small Dog Breeds That Don’t Shed or Make You Sneeze

    In general, small breed dogs have different issues than large breed dogs. And while each small breed has a specific set of needs, including nutrition, veterinary care and exercise, etc, there are some commonalities small breeds share.

    Small Dogs Need Exercise, Too

    Just because a dog is small, doesn’t mean they don’t need the same things that large breed dogs need to live happy, healthy lives. And that includes exercise.

    You should walk your dog with his feet on the ground … like any other size dog. And there is no such thing as an “indoor dog” — small dog breeds need to walk every day. If your dog is trained on puppy pads, one long walk is usually okay, but two shorter walks a day may be better. If your small dog doesn’t use puppy pads, plan on going outside a few times a day, as those small bladders need to be relieved often.

    white small dog on walk

    A Small Breed Dog Is Not a Toy or Fashion Accessory

    Small breed dogs need to be dogs, not supermodels on Designer Row’s catwalk. If you put a winter coat on your Yorkie that happens to be a motorcycle jacket, and it keeps him warm, you’ve covered two birds with one outfit: your dog stays warm, and he’s the best dressed dog in the neighborhood. But if you insist that your longhaired Chihuahua wear designer sneakers, sun glasses and a tiara every time she goes out, your dog most likely won’t be too happy. Keep in mind, our small dogs are animals, not fashion accessories.

    Be careful of small children around small breeds

    Small breeds can be hurt more easily than large breeds. Their bones are smaller and more fragile in general. Plus, tiny dogs may be frightened by the rough and tumble play of toddlers and young children. In particular, small, delicate toy dogs including the Yorkshire Terrier, Chihuahua, Maltese, Toy Poodle, Japanese Chin, Chinese Crested, and others can be badly injured in rough play or if accidently dropped, stepped on or sat on.

    kid with dog

    That doesn’t mean that you can’t bring one of these breeds into your home if you have small children. It does mean that your child should always be supervised when interacting with these tiny dogs. As soon as you bring your new pup home, teach your children that the dog is very small and fragile (like a newborn baby) and can be easily hurt.

    There are some small breeds that are sturdier than others, like the French Bulldog, Pug and Boston Terrier, but that doesn’t mean that they can’t be injured. Do your research to find the right breed in terms of temperament and lifestyle and prepare your home before bringing any new dog into your family. Regardless of the breed, always teach children to be gentle with dogs.

    Related: Love the French Bulldog But Worried About Health Issues? Here Are 5 Alternative Breeds to Consider.

    A Unique Health Problem With Small Breed Dogs

    Small breed dogs tend to have more dental problems than medium or large breed dogs. Indeed, a study of 1,300 dogs published in the Journal of Veterinary Dentistry in 1994 found that smaller dog breeds had significantly more periodontal disease than larger breeds. That’s because all dogs have the same number of adult teeth: 42 permanent teeth. Now consider the physics of fitting 42 teeth into the tiny mouth of a dog like a Maltese.

    Bye Bye Dog Breath dental sticks and powder
    Bye, Bye Dog Breath Dental Kit
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    Because of the size of a small breed’s mouth, the teeth tend to be crowded, with some teeth even rotating to make room. Small breeds also tend to be less inclined to chew on hard chew toys, which can help remove tartar.

    If you have a small breed dog, start brushing their teeth as soon as you bring them home to get them used to the brush. If your small dog turns into a demon every time you get near his mouth with the toothbrush, use dental chews and dental powders, like our Bye, Bye Dog Breath dental powder and our dental sticks, along with dental chew toys. Dog parents should also plan to have their small dog’s teeth professionally cleaned at the vet’s office at least once a year (talk to your vet about your particular dog and needs).

    Related: 8 of the Healthiest Dog Breeds on the Planet

    Small Dog Syndrome

    Small dogs are so cute, we often let them get away with just about everything. Barking, jumping, lunging, even snarling — all can be dominant behavior — and they get away with it because they’re just so darn adorable.

    Humans often think that their little Yorkie thinks he’s as big as a Doberman, and that’s why he’s barking at big dogs. (The most likely reason is because of fear.) But even if your little guy does think he’s the same size as the Newfoundland he’s barking at, it’s still bad behavior.

    Small dog aggression

    Small dog syndrome, or when a dog exhibits dominant behavior, is largely the fault of the human caretakers. Instead of training a dog not to bark or growl at other dogs, they pick up their small dogs and cuddle them. “Isn’t he cute the way he growls at that Great Dane?” The dog learns the behavior is not only fine, but that growing and barking and begging at the table will be rewarded by affection.

    You would frown (or worse) at the owner of a German Shepherd or a Rottweiler if they let their dog bark and lunge at your dog, wouldn’t you? That’s because you expect the owner of a big bad Doberman to train their dog to behave. The same should be true for small dog breeds.

    Related: Why ‘Good’ Dogs Bite and How to Prevent It

    Your tiny little Napoleon is just as rude as a barking big dog. All dogs need boundaries and training to show them what you expect them to do and the correct way to behave so they can be well adjusted dogs and have satisfying lives.

    Not All Small Breeds Are the Same

    Just like any dog breeds, small breeds have different qualities that are generally shared by that breed. The Jack Russell Terrier has a ton of energy and a super strong prey drive; the Pekingese prefers a short, scenic stroll and as an imperial dog, he expects to be spoiled. Yorkshire Terriers live to play and love to learn tricks; French Bulldogs are charming, natural born comedians. The affectionate Chinese Crested lives for the spotlight and is always ready for her closeup.

    yorkie on couch

    As you can see, these toy breeds have distinct personality characteristics as well as different exercise needs and potential health issues. It’s not a great idea to choose a dog because you love the way that breed looks — unless you’re willing to change your lifestyle to fit the dog’s needs. 

    Do your research before choosing a breed (if you’re after a purebred). Choose a breed who will be compatible with your lifestyle and your family makeup. Otherwise, everyone will be stressed and unhappy — and that cute little puppy may end up in a shelter.

    However, don’t forget that you can find some amazing small breed dogs in shelters and rescue. In fact, some of the cutest small breed dogs in the world are mutts. Just ask Norbert.


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    After Aja Trier’s work repeatedly got mistaken for Vincent van Gogh’s paintings, she decided to have a little fun with it, adding dogs to the mix.

    Trier has always been drawn to the impressionist style, as it captures a quick moment in time using short, thick strokes.

    “It started with a love for texture. I started painting with a spatula I stole from the kitchen when I was 18,” says Trier. “In art school I started honing my skills while using a palette knife. I love the thickness of the paint and the immediacy of it all.”

    As her style evolved, moving away from a spatula to brushes, people began mistaking her work for the famous 19th century painter.

    “I had painted an Eiffel Tower piece I called ‘Seine’ in 2011 that people started sharing on Pinterest with the caption ‘Eiffel Tower by van Gogh’ and it spread like wild fire,” she says. (Van Gogh never even saw the Eiffel Tower.)

    Related: Stunning Art Project Shines Light on the 5,500 Dogs Euthanized a Day

    She turned the mix up into a series, calling it “van Gogh Never,” showcasing things van Gogh never saw.

    It was during this time dogs entered the picture…literally.

    “In 2018, I was preparing for a solo show and found this adorable Pomeranian sleeping in the grass. I decided to put him in a ‘Starry Night’ setting,” says Trier. “The response to the piece was encouraging and a lot of people replied to posts I made with ‘what about painting a German Shepherd?’ ‘Why not a Corgi?,’ so I thought I would start painting different breeds.” 

    Now, with more than 100 paintings in the series, Trier is receiving requests from dog parents all around the world to paint their pup.

    Malinois dog painting
    Image courtesy of Aja Trier

    Each painting takes 2-7 days to create and 3 weeks to dry. She tries to make each painting very special for the customer. When people request a painting (more information on her site), she wants to not only the breed and see a photo but is also interested in the dog’s personality.

    Related: Man Takes Up Painting to Save His Cancerous Dog

    “People seem to really enjoy my contemporary take on the iconic work and knowing I can add their pet to a painting inspired by a work of art they have a connection with is a thrilling prospect,” she tells us.

    Here are a few of our favorites:

    corgi painting
    Image courtesy of Aja Trier
    German Shepherd dog painting
    Image courtesy of Aja Trier
    Bull terrier dog painting
    Image courtesy of Aja Trier
    Chihuahua dog painting
    Image courtesy of Aja Trier
    Schnauzer dog painting
    Image courtesy of Aja Trier

    To see the entire Starry Night Dogs series and learn how you can commission your own dog artwork, head over to the website.

    Related: Dog Uses Her Painting Skills to Raise Money for Charities


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    Valentine’s Day is the perfect occasion to show love for that special somebody in your life — your dog! Best friend, confidant, spiritual guide, workout buddy, there’s nothing better than the love of a dog. So pick up a gift this year for your furry friends and the people who also love them.

    Here’s a selection that’ll make your dog (and your dog’s admirers) feel your love on Valentine’s Day.

    Dogs & Horses Rolled Leather Collars and Leashes

    French bulldog in pink collar
    Courtesy of Dogs & Horses

    For the cultured pup, these rolled leather collars and leashes are handmade from the softest, smoothest leather, providing your furry ultimate comfort. Rolled leather prevents tangling and knots forming, so it’s perfect for longhaired or curly coated dogs. With solid brass or nickel-plated buckles and D-rings and an internal cord made from marine rope, these collars and leashes are made by artisans to last for a lifetime. Available in a wide selection of colors.

    Starting at $42

    Magisso Slow Feeder Ceramic Dog Bowl

    magisso dog bowl slow feeder 1
    Courtesy of Magisso

    When dogs hoover their food in a matter of seconds, it can cause indigestion, gas, discomfort, and even bloat. So show your dog how much you love her with the Magisso Slow Feeder Ceramic Dog Bowl. Your dog has to eat around a 3-D bone shape in the bowl’s bottom, which slows her down and increases chewing for more saliva production and better dental health. Dishwasher safe. Available in blush, blue heaven, slate and ebony.

    Starting at $28

    Related: Behind the Creator: Meet the Company Revolutionizing How Dogs Eat and Drink

    Labbvenn Föra Faux Fur Dog Blanket

    dog on blanket
    Courtesy of Labbvenn

    Surround your best friend with uber-luxury on Valentine’s Day with the Föra Ultimate Faux Fur Dog Blanket from Polish brand Labbvenn. Extremely soft and deliciously warm, the faux fur looks incredibly realistic and adds a touch of elegance to your home (and your dog!). Hand-finished in the traditional method, the reverse side has stopper-fabric to prevent shifting. Use in your dog’s bed or on your dog’s favorite spot on the sofa for a cushiony layer of protection. In small and medium in silver or chestnut.

    Starting at $75

    Bye, Bye Dog Breath Dental Kit

    Bye Bye Dog Breath Dental Line_1_Photo
    Photo credit: Maxwell Mason

    Give your dog the gift of good dental health and a longer life with our Bye, Bye Dog Breath Dental Kit. Developed by veterinarians with the highest quality ingredients, it combats the number-one health issue in dogs: periodontal disease. Natural ingredients remove plaque, prevent tartar, support gum health and freshen breath. The dual-layered dental sticks reduce plaque, prevent tartar buildup,and remove bad bacteria. Sprinkle the powder on your dog’s food and use the dental sticks for a healthy snack that cleans the teeth. Available separately too.

    Price: $49

    Related: The Story Behind Why We Launched Bye, Bye Dog Breath Line

    Wooldog Hand-Knit Dog Sweater

    dog in red sweater
    Image courtesy of Wooldog

    Keep your pup comfy this winter in a Wooldog Hand-Knit Sweater. Made by artisans in Poland from the finest wool, it’s never scratchy and super warm. This classic cable design takes 20 hours to make — and it shows. Beautifully crafted with a snuggly turtleneck, it’s anti-allergic and perfect for cooler seasons as well as indoor wear. The 85 percent wool, 15 perceny acrylic blend is hand wash or machine wash on the hand wash or wool cycle; dry flat. From XXS to XXL as well as custom-made sizes, in multiple colors.

    Starting at $79

    Dogmade Custom Breed Minimalist Dog Artwork

    dog artwork
    Image courtesy of Dogmade

    Celebrate your love for your dog with a Custom Breed Minimalist Dog Artwork. This modern art gift from the Scandinavian brand Dogmade is produced on the highest quality heavyweight Hahnemühle German Etching fine art paper, which is free of free of acid and lignin and guaranteed to last over 40 years. A truly unique way to honor the four-legged love of your life. Choose among 60 breeds, seven colors and three sizes.

    Starting at $85

    Maxim Customs Matching Leather Dog Collar and Bracelet Set

    dog collar and bracelet
    Image courtesy of Maxim Customs

    Show the world how much you love your dog with this Matching Leather Dog Collar and Bracelet Set. Budapest brand Maxim Customs crafts this collection in-house by hand-painting full-grain vegetable Italian leather. No two pieces are the same. The solid brass hardware is durable and will not rust. Completely animal-safe; will not shed any paint. The solid brass pet tag has the Maxim Customs logo on one side; you can engrave your dog’s name on the other side. In small to XL in pink/mint/turquoise.

    Starting at $85

    Dug and Bitch Natural Kaolin Clay Fur Mask

    clay dog mask
    Image courtesy of Dug and Bitch

    Treat your pup to a spa experience with Scottish brand Dug and Bitch Natural Kaolin Clay Fur Mask. Certified organic, it’s ethically sourced from the Charentes Basin in France. Kaolinite, or rose clay, is a mild clay that detoxifies, boosts circulation and gently cleans. Use by wetting the fur with warm water, sprinkling the clay on a small area and slowly adding more water while massaging to form a paste. Add a little mood music and wait for five minutes. Rinse completely. Your dog has never looked better!

    Price: $15.50

    Related: Need to Give Your Dog a Bath or Good Brush? Here’s How to Not Make It a Complete Disaster.


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